Beeman P17 Pistol Project

I’m not one to make a huge todo about my own birthdays, but when I saw a Beeman P17 for sale at a local store, my birthday was all the excuse I needed to justify another airgun purchase. It has been about 2.5 years since I bought one of these, and I was kind of surprised to see it lubricated with something that reminded me of cosmoline. I cleaned up all the nasty lubrication, replaced the pison o-ring, and lightly lubed it with some air tool oil. At this point, it was shooting 7.4 grain wadcutters at 410 fps, just as the package said it would.

I’ve decided to leave this one as a pistol, but I wanted a longer barrel for a little added speed. My original 880 has gotten worn out from being taken apart and stressed to the limit, so I decided to take its barrel and use it for my new P17. I cut it to 10″, polished the barrel and ends, recrowned and added a leade to the barrel. Six applications of cold blue were made, finishing a beautiful barrel.

Barrel stays in place with 220 grit wet/dry sandpaper

Barrel retention was a problem that had an easy solution – 220 grit sandpaper applied with grit facing barrel. The stock clamp is then applied, locking the barrel in tight for good accuracy and a tight seal. Here’s how I secured the barrel toward the muzzle end:

Note the silicone tubing

A .25″ length of 3/16″ x 5/16″ silicone tubing was stretched over the barrel and pressed into the end of the “slide”. It provides a tight fit and keeps everything centered. From the above picture, you can see the custom 65mm long LDC that I built to make this even quieter for indoor target practice. The P17 has quite a pop even with the longer barrel and this LDC turns it into a mouse fart.

Silent but deadly

With the trigger adjustment screw backed out a bit, it has a nice long first stage, hits a wall, and the second stage breaks almost like glass. Combined with a new muzzle velocity of 450 fps with 7.4 grain pellets and 400 fps with 10 grain pellets, this is a accurate, quiet shooter, perfect for target practice or hunting very small pests.

The beautiful thing about this build is that the P17 can be cocked without the need to backdraft or make major modifications to the frame. It can be done with a very limited supply of tools and an assortment of sandpaper and steel wool. If you have any questions on this build or would like to purchase a LDC for your P17, head over to my contact page and I’ll be happy to answer your questions or build you a LDC.

Author: Geo

I've enjoyed shooting and hunting with airguns since my early teen years. For well over a decade, I have shared my passion for airguns on this website.

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